January 30, 2014

Rivers & Revolutions Students Render Impressions


Bringing our attentiveness to place and cultivating our own sense of and relationship to that place lies at the heart of stewardship.  For the past few months, I've again had the pleasure of working with Rivers & Revolutions students from CCHS, our local high school, as a mentor in their community stewardship program.  This semester, we collaborated on an exhibition for the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, conveying the experience of Sense of Place from various vantage points.

My students (Charlotte Copp, Rosie Alston-Follansbee, James Henderson, Haley Proctor, and Will Royal) and I began by visiting three historic and distinctly different wetland areas that thrive on or near the Concord River floodplain -- Great Meadows, Gowing's Swamp/Thoreau's Bog, and Moore's Swamp.  While memorable moments marked each engaged exploration -- discovering the red-headed bush crickets behind the chorus of song at Great Meadows...


or harvesting autumn olives near Gowing's Swamp...

Haley picking autumn olives aided by James' shoulders below
it was a sun-warmed, barefooted, autumn afternoon exploring the primordial basin of Moore's Swamp, in the shadow of Author's Ridge, that inspired their beautiful, evocative renderings, shown at the end of this post, and on display in The Square at the deCordova from January 30 through March 30, 2014.

Our day exploring Moore's Swamp




James ventures out one of many red maple 'tip-ups' in the swamp, which was his "backyard" when growing up
Rosie experiments making inks from various wild berries

Charlotte rubs off jewelweed seed husks to reveal the beautiful blue kernals inside

Rosie finds a baby northern black water snake on the path
Below, each student's sense of Moore's Swamp, beautifully conveyed, is meant to inspire appreciation and thoughtful stewardship of this historic and special place.  Enjoy!

Charlotte
Will
Haley
James
Rosie





1 comment:

  1. What a treat to see Rosie's work. I remember when she was born. She grew up on the doorstep of the Great Meadows!

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